The Queen’s Golden Jubilee

Celebrating 50 years of Reign

 

In 2002 projection artist Ross Ashton was commissioned to produce the projection element of the ‘son et lumiere’ that celebrated the 50th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth’s reign.  Ashton created the storyboard and artwork for the fifteen-minute projection show that featured images reminiscing the last five decades.  The show included Cadillacs, flower power symbols, vinyl records, views from outer space, and children’s faces looking forward to the future of Great Britain.

Despite multiple technical challenges, Ashton produced the movingly nostalgic piece under the extremely tight time restraints of just seven weeks.  Ten Pigi 7kW projectors were expertly concealed inside of the palace forecourt, and were run in pairs using 18cm lenses in order to produce the 105ft wide image.  Control was provided through Pigi 6 software and performed on a PC.

“Working at Buckingham Palace was a privilege for all of us.  It was the first time that the Queen had given permission for her residence to be used in this way.”

Ross Ashton has been invited back to work with Buckingham Palace twice since the Queen’s Golden Jubilee, including the celebration of the 60th anniversary of the end of WWII.  He is also Creative Director of the Face of Britain Projection.

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The expertly crafted projection artwork molds the flag of Great Britain perfectly dimensioned upon the façade of Buckingham Palace.

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The grandeur of Great Britain is expressed in mesmerizing effect by Ashton’s use of symbolism and wielding of expert precision with the architecture of the palace.

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Here the half century of history is summarized in an elegant snap shot.  Ashton’s work is so crisp and clear that it appears as if the crushed velvet curtain in this backdrop actually envelops Buckingham Palace.

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Ashton demonstrates his amazing talent for artistic images that provide simultaneously active layers of meaning in a way that only this art form can facilitate.