The Venetian Hotel and Casino “Winter in Venice”

Showing Venice to Vegas

 

“We can take a building and reimagine it for night into a different building and then put it back for the daytime. For the visitors, it’s two different experiences and yet we have not altered it in any way.”

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Winter in Venice takes the audience on a time lapsed journey through all of the seasons via changing images of nature in Venice. Above ice sickles grow to the sound of sleigh bells carried on blustering winter wind.

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Winter wonderland of ice and snow envelopes the Venetian landscape.

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Grapes swell and mushrooms emerge in the season of harvest, before the falling of leaves signals winter’s return.

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Life emerges once more, in a lush and vibrant flower-filled spring.

Ross Ashton was initially asked by the Venetian to consult on the technical installation and produce all the projection artwork, after which he tendered and won the project altogether. Ashton was chosen to produce the visual show principally because of his reputation for effective pictorial storytelling with detailed and elegantly depicted historical references. Ashton’s projects provides increased significance and historical relevance to any building or environment.

“The challenge, was to produce a unique and interesting narrative, to engage onlookers in each case, which also required a distinctive Venetian feel, and had to be delivered to exceptionally high standards.”

Ashton has created a series of works for permanent display, which is being shown nightly, year round. The colorful, vibrant giant images are projected onto a 25 x 25m canvas that is part of the Venetian Hotel’s face. The Venetian goal was for each show to have real depth and substance as well as being instantly accessible for the public. The resulting phenomenon has been hugely successful at the Venetian.

“Most of my work is a celebration of the historical, of the building and its place in history. If I can possibly use a real photograph, I do. I invent as little as possible.”